Difference between revisions of "MOS 6502"

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[[Image:MOS 6502.jpg|thumb|256x256px|A MOS 6502 chip.]]
 
[[Image:MOS 6502.jpg|thumb|256x256px|A MOS 6502 chip.]]
  
The '''MOS 6502''' is an 8-bit microprocessor designed by [[Chuck Peddle]] and a team of engineers at [[MOS Technology]]. The processor was one of the most popular chips for home computers and video games from the 1970s through the 1980s.
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The '''MOS 6502''' is an 8-bit microprocessor designed by [[Chuck Peddle]] and a team of engineers at [[MOS Technology]] and released in 1975. The processor was one of the most popular chips for home computers and video games from the late 1970s through the 1980s. The 6502 is still used in embedded systems to this day.
  
 
I didn't start learning about the 6502 until after I began playing with the debugger of a NES emulator. There, I began teaching myself about [[6502 Machine Language]]. I'm still quite terrible at it, but I can make simple changes to existing code.
 
I didn't start learning about the 6502 until after I began playing with the debugger of a NES emulator. There, I began teaching myself about [[6502 Machine Language]]. I'm still quite terrible at it, but I can make simple changes to existing code.
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* [[Commodore Plus/4]]
 
* [[Commodore Plus/4]]
 
* [[Nintendo Entertainment System]]
 
* [[Nintendo Entertainment System]]
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A 16-bit version of the 6502 was created in 1983 and variations were used in the [[Apple IIGS]] and [[Super Nintendo Entertainment System]].
  
 
==Media==
 
==Media==

Revision as of 09:35, 13 June 2018

A MOS 6502 chip.

The MOS 6502 is an 8-bit microprocessor designed by Chuck Peddle and a team of engineers at MOS Technology and released in 1975. The processor was one of the most popular chips for home computers and video games from the late 1970s through the 1980s. The 6502 is still used in embedded systems to this day.

I didn't start learning about the 6502 until after I began playing with the debugger of a NES emulator. There, I began teaching myself about 6502 Machine Language. I'm still quite terrible at it, but I can make simple changes to existing code.

Devices

There are about a couple dozen devices which use the 6502, but here are the most popular ones:

A 16-bit version of the 6502 was created in 1983 and variations were used in the Apple IIGS and Super Nintendo Entertainment System.

Media

Videos

Links