Difference between revisions of "Outlaw (Atari 2600)"

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[[Image:Outlaw - 2600 - USA.jpg|thumb|256x256px|North American box art.]]
 
[[Image:Outlaw - 2600 - USA.jpg|thumb|256x256px|North American box art.]]
  
'''''Outlaw''''' is a shoot-em-up video game developed by [[David Crane]] and published by [[Atari]] in 1978 for the [[Atari 2600]]. The game has several different modes supporting one or two players. Each player controls their outlaw and can shoot at their opponent. The objective is to hit your opponent more than they hit you in the allotted time. In single-player mode, one player is replaced by a moving target. The game is highly derivitive of the arcade game ''[[Gun Fight]]''.
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'''''Outlaw''''' is a shoot-em-up video game developed by [[David Crane]] and published by [[Atari]] in 1978 for the [[Atari 2600]]. The game has several different modes supporting one or two players. Each player controls their outlaw and can shoot at their opponent. The objective is to hit your opponent more than they hit you in the allotted time. In single-player mode, one player is replaced by a moving target. The game is highly derivative of [[Taito]]'s arcade game, ''[[Gun Fight]]''.
  
 
==Personal==
 
==Personal==

Latest revision as of 11:22, 24 November 2021

North American box art.

Outlaw is a shoot-em-up video game developed by David Crane and published by Atari in 1978 for the Atari 2600. The game has several different modes supporting one or two players. Each player controls their outlaw and can shoot at their opponent. The objective is to hit your opponent more than they hit you in the allotted time. In single-player mode, one player is replaced by a moving target. The game is highly derivative of Taito's arcade game, Gun Fight.

Personal

My family had this game for our Atari 2600 around 1986. I remember enjoying playing it with my family members.

Status

I do not own this game and I have not made an attempt to reach a high score in any of the single-player modes.

Review

Video Game Review Icon - Enjoyment.png Video Game Review Icon - Control.png Video Game Review Icon - Appearance.png Video Game Review Icon - Sound.png Video Game Review Icon - Replayability.png
2 3 2 1 4

Best Version: Atari 2600

— This section contains spoilers! —

Good

  • Like many early Atari games, it had several different modes which gives the game a bit of replay value.
  • Having a single-player mode was really nice, and uncommon for games of this style.
  • The various obstacles (stage coach and cactus) are thematic to the setting.

Bad

  • There is no way to handicap a player who is objectively better than another.

Ugly

  • The primitive concept and limited hardware of the Atari means there just isn't enough depth in the game to prevent it from becoming boring quite quickly.

Media

Box Art

This art was used in all regions with only minor changes in the layout between North America and Europe. The attractive collage was painted by John Enright and uses a promotional photo from The Outlaw Josie Wales for the most prominent gunslinger. In typical Atari fashion, it promises far more than what is in the game.

Documentation

Videos

Game play.

Download

Manuel Rotschkar has disassembled and commented the source code of Outlaw.

Titles

Language Native Transliteration Translation
English (North American) Outlaw
English (Sears release) Gunslinger

Links

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